skip to Main Content

Donate to Global Emergency Care's Coronavirus Response Fund

When a crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic hits, the poorest communities suffer the worst effects. That's why Global Emergency Care has launched the Emergency Action Fund in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

Now, more than ever, your support of GEC is critical. Our Emergency Care Practitioners (ECPs) are some of the only specialist emergency care providers in Uganda and are the most equipped to deal with the COVID-19 crisis there. They are on the front lines of this pandemic as it spreads across Uganda, and are the communities’ best hope for fighting this virus and preventing unmitigated community spread.

To respond to this crisis, we have launched this Emergency Response Fund to make sure the courage of health workers on the front lines is honored with meaningful support, and the people most at risk in this pandemic are cared for. This project will help Uganda respond to:

1) The local COVID-19 crisis by providing equipment, supplies, resources, and knowledge sharing to our ground teams;
2) The long-term surveillance of COVID-19 in the country; and
3) Other public health threats in the future

Through this difficult time, our commitment to our ECPs, staff, their families, patients, partners, and emergency care development in Uganda is stronger than ever. Together, the actions we take can make a world of difference in the lives of so many.

​Global Emergency Care is dedicated to make lifesaving medical care available to all.

Global Emergency Care (GEC) runs a two-year, emergency medicine training program for non-physician clinicians, in collaboration with local and national institutions.

The Emergency Care Practitioner (ECP) program is designed to teach symptoms based emergency medicine to educate strong clinicians, as well as teach clinicians how to be quality educators to train the incoming classes.

​After completion of the course, the ECPs work as qualified clinicians and teach the incoming classes of ECP students. The goal is to build a scalable, emergency care system, with our graduates teaching courses across the country.

Every year, thousands of people in Uganda, many of them children, die needlessly because they don’t have access to emergency care. In a country that currently lacks any Ugandan-trained emergency care physicians, many are dying from easily treatable conditions such as diarrhea, pneumonia, malaria, or injuries because they don’t get the right care or any care at all. GEC saves lives by teaching healthcare providers how to recognize and treat these illnesses and injuries quickly and effectively. 

What we do works. Since 2009, GEC-trained ECPs have treated more than 80,000 patients who otherwise would not have received care. Many more patients are surviving due to the training we’ve provided. Our goal is to grow the program so that all Ugandans will have access to lifesaving emergency care.

At GEC, we believe health care is a human right. That is why our mission is to create access to lifesaving medical care for all Ugandans. To fulfill our mission, we have created a Theory of Change – a comprehensive description and illustration of how and why we expect to implement this desired change within Uganda. Join us and help make lifesaving care available to everyone!
​ Learn more >>>>> 

OUR UPDATES

Racism is a Public Health Crisis

The brutal murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and the countless others before them are a result of brutality that has been and still is perpetuated by a culture of white supremacy and racist violence towards Black people. These are not one-time incidents by rogue police officers or vigilantes, but rather the direct consequence of a structurally racist system that has treated Black lives as enemies.

The events of the past few weeks have caused us to reflect on ourselves as individuals, our privilege, our organization, our industry, and where we go from here. We acknowledge that racism is an ongoing public health crisis. It is a consequence of a structurally racist system that is failing people of color every day. This is readily apparent not only in the police brutality that disproportionately effects Black Americans, but also in the history of slavery and discrimination that can be seen today in many social determinants of health. While the COVID-19 pandemic has laid these inequities bare for all Americans to see, the underlying injustices have endured for generations.

As an organization, Global Emergency Care continues to be committed to strengthening the emergency care workforce capacity in Uganda and expanding the cadre of national clinical and research emergency medicine experts. We focus on local advocacy, and leveraging our privilege to amplify the Ugandan voice. Our vision is to be a part of building an emergency care system that is designed, implemented, and led by Ugandans for Ugandans. 

We continue to be committed to demonstrate reciprocity to support the work of the leading Ugandan institutions in the quest to build a sustainable emergency care system. We strive to be a catalyst to reduce the unequal power dynamics between the global north and south by trying to build capacity, lead from behind, and do our best to listen and learn. Moving forward, we commit to inclusivity and to be enablers of our Ugandan colleagues in capacity development, academic research, and advocacy. 

We work in Uganda where our staff on the ground is 100% Ugandan, but as global health practitioners, we recognize the enduring legacy of colonialism and structural racism in global health. We acknowledge the unequal power dynamics: racism, classism, and many of the residual exploitations of a terrible colonial past, while at the same time must commit to not engage in a neocolonial narrative. Today, we continue to commit to do our part to decolonize global health.

As Seye Ambimbola eloquently put it, “We can begin to truly decolonize global health by being aware of what we do not know, that people understand their own lives better than we could ever do, that they and only they can truly improve their own circumstances and that those of us who work in global health are only, at best, enablers.”

We have much work to do. In particular, those of us who are white must continually reckon with our privilege and take actions to enact a power shift. We need to have hard conversations, challenge our assumptions, cultivate empathy, and actively pursue an anti-racist, anti-colonialist agenda. 

We do not yet have the answers of how we will implement these changes, but we are committed to this work and will keep all of you – our friends, families, supporters, and partners – updated as we do the necessary work. Thank you for fighting for a more equitable world with us.

In humility, commitment, and solidarity,

Mark Bisanzo, MD, DTM&H, FACEP 
President of the Board of Directors

Heather Hammerstedt, MD, MPH, FACEP
Board of Directors

Stacey Chamberlain, MD, MPH
Board of Directors

Bradley Dreifuss, MD
Board of Directors

Tom Neill, MPH, MBA
Executive Director

Sign up for updates from GEC!

* indicates required
Learn more about GEC’s innovative model of emergency care training and service delivery in this new video featuring GEC’s work in Uganda.

TO BRING LIFESAVING MEDICAL CARE TO ALL,
WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT

Back To Top